Elk Grove City Council Approves Reduced Speeds in City

September 10, 2015 | In the coming months, motorists in Elk Grove will be subjected to reduced speeds on many of the city's main ro...

September 10, 2015 |

In the coming months, motorists in Elk Grove will be subjected to reduced speeds on many of the city's main roads.

Although the city council unanimously approved all the changes recommended by the city's engineering staff at last night's regular meeting, there was extensive discussion of particular segments recommended for speed reductions. Vice Mayor Pat Hume and Council Member Steve Detrick expressed concern that certain roads, such as Elk Grove-Florin and Waterman, had segments with differing speed limits. 

The most specific case discussed was Waterman Road. As approved, the speed limits going south to north within Elk Grove city limits would go from 55, to 35, to 45, and back to 55 mph. 

"I think that is awfully confusing," Hume said.

During public comment Elk Grove residents Michael Monasky and Shirley Peters said they agreed with the lower speed limits citing improved safety for the community. 

Monasky further urged lowering speed limits on a number of non-arterial residential feeder streets to 25 mph to enhance pedestrian safety. He also urged that motorist being cited for breaking speed limits in affected segments be given warnings for one year to adjust to the changes.

During their deliberations, council members held out the possibility of making speed limits on Waterman Road consistent at some point in the future. According to the staff report, the new speed limits will become effective one month following approval. 

Some of the approved speed changes include four different limits
on Waterman Road between Grant Line Road and Calvine Road. 








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1 comment

Anonymous said...

Here are some factors considered by the City of Sacramento in setting speed limits. All I seem to have heard last evening was, "speed limit either at or below the speed driven by 85 percent of vehicles surveyed". Why did I not hear anything about the other items being surveyed? Those would seem to be very important factors to have considered.

http://portal.cityofsacramento.org/Public-Works/Transportation/Traffic-Data-Maps/Speed%20Limits

The California Vehicle Code (CVC) allows cities to set specific speed limits for streets within their boundaries. In Sacramento, the City has established limits between 25 and 55mph, based on engineering traffic surveys. In each street's survey, traffic engineers study these factors:

Street collision history
Pedestrian and bicycle traffic
Amount of traffic typically on the street
Speed of traffic
Roadway characteristics (length, width, lanes and visibility)
Amount and severity of curves
Curbside parking practices and number and type of driveways
Type of area (residential, commercial, offices, recreational, etc.)

After considering these factors, traffic engineers set the speed limit either at or below the speed driven by 85 percent of vehicles surveyed.



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