Update on Storms and Preparations in Roseville



January 10, 2017 |   

Issued at 3:30 p.m. today by the City of Roseville


City staff continue to monitor streams and responding to a handful of minor calls regarding downed trees and localized street flooding. Today's rain is of concern because we’ve had just one day, instead of two or three, for the ground to dry out and the creek system to drain. Rain is also expected for Wednesday, but we expect the worst of this series of storms to have passed by tomorrow.

Outlook

Heavy rain: Significant amounts of rain are expected with Tuesday’s storm, with the heaviest amounts forecasted to fall between 4-10 p.m. We are currently expecting about .75" of rain during that time. 
Thunderstorms possible: Atmospheric conditions are also conducive to thunderstorm activity this afternoon and through the early evening hours, which could produce heavy amounts of rain in short periods of time.  Forecasting the location and amount of rainfall from thunderstorms is unpredictable and may cause localized issues.
Areas to watch: We are most likely to see effects from the storms in the older neighborhoods in the southern and eastern parts of the city.
Linda & Cirby Creeks: Similar to Sunday’s storm, Linda Creek and Cirby Creek could rise rapidly to the same levels as they did this weekend, and stay that way until early Wednesday morning. We may see water in roadways on Champion Oaks Drive, Loretto Drive and Coloma Drive. We do not expect water to impact any structures in these areas.
Dry Creek: Dry Creek takes longer to rise and then to fall. We could a few inches of water could also reach Royer Park and Saugstad Park. City crews will monitor the bridge crossings of Dry Creek at Folsom Road, Douglas Boulevard, Darling Way, Riverside Avenue and Vernon Street through the night.
Bike Trails: Miner's Ravine bike trail remains closed. The trail from Royer to Saugstad Park will also be closed. Other trails will be closed as needed.
You may see water cover portions of other bike trails around the city. This is normal and is not cause for concern. Many of our bike trails were purposely built in the floodplain. Also, some park locations, like Marco Dog Park, are designed as detention basins and will collect water.
We want to emphasize that it’s not a guarantee of where water will or won’t go, as the dynamics of Mother Nature can change. Rather, it is to be used as an estimation of what could happen.

Preparation

Encouraging signups for Alert Roseville: We are also encouraging everyone to sign up for Alert Roseville to receive notifications based on the address they register with.  It is important to note that a person doesn’t have to live in Roseville to be notified of such dangers. 
If a family member living out-of-state, for example, wants to receive alerts so they can arrange care for an elderly or disabled family member, they can sign up for Alert Roseville as well.
Sandbags: Sandbag stations are open until 7 p.m. this evening. Proof of Roseville residency is required. Details are here.
Reporting downed tree limbs, power lines, clogged storm drains, street flooding, etc.: See “Preparing for Winter Storms” on the city's homepage for a list of contact phone numbers.

During the storm

Staff on call: Our staff from many city departments will be working or on standby through the end of today's storm and it's impacts.
Communications: Twitter (@CityofRoseville) will be the primary source for the very latest emergency information, followed closely by the city’s website. We are also posting on NextDoor and Facebook.
To report concerns: See "Preparing for Winter Storms"  on our website.
Do not use social media to report concerns or emergencies.
On-site monitoring of creeks: Creek levels can be monitored online here.
Coordination with neighboring agencies: Roseville is in close communications with staff from Placer County Office of Emergency Services.




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