Lungren Opens DC Lobbying Firm, Seeks $20 Million From Fed For First Client; Part of Shifting Influence of 'Movement Conservatism'

June 17, 2014 | If nothing else, former California Congressman and Attorney General Dan Lungren has popped the pin on F. Scott Fitzgera...

June 17, 2014 |

If nothing else, former California Congressman and Attorney General Dan Lungren has popped the pin on F. Scott Fitzgerald's famous quote about there being no second acts in American lives.

Lungren, who has been involved in California Republican politics since the late 70's, might be better compared to a cat with nine lives. Lungren's latest resurrection comes almost two years after being narrowly defeated by Dr. Ami Bera in the California's 7th Congressional district.
Former Congressman Dan Lungren
in a 2012 appearance in Elk Grove. 

According to The Hill, Lungren and Brian Lopina, former chief of staff to former Rep. Ernest Istook (R-Okla.), have formed a Washington DC, lobbying firm dubbed Washington Navigators. Their first client is Fairfax 2015.

Hosted by the City of Fairfax, Va., the event is seeking $20 million in federal funding to host a 2015 Olympic-style competition for firefighters and police officers called the World Police and Fire Games. As a Congressman, Lungren ironically railed against pork barrel spending and so-called earmarks.

For Lungren, the lobbying gig is his second time working the halls of Congress. Lungren's first go around came following his defeat by Gray Davis in the 1998 California gubernatorial race.

In 2001 Lungren worked for the Washington DC lobbying firm Venable, whose roster of clients included Lockheed Martin, Verizon, Marriott International and various tribal groups.

Lungren's most recent incarnation as a high-paid lobbyist might be part of what New York Times columnist Paul Krugman recently predicted as the decline of movement conservatism in his explanation of Eric Cantor's surprising defeat. If Krugman's description holds true in the next couple election cycles, a lot more Congress members, both Republicans and Democrats, could be forced into careers as lobbyist. 



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